Posts Tagged ‘beetle’

Beginners Guide to Pollinators

January 13, 2014

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Beginners Guide to Pollinators and Other Flower Visitors. Beatriz Moisset

An illustrated beginner’s field guide to insect flower visitors, including pollinators. The guide provides concise descriptions, photos and life history information of the most common insects found visiting flowers. It includes time of year, geographic area and favorite flowers. Also mentioned are those that act as pollinators and whether they may sting.

Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes and Lulu.com

Available at no cost during Pollinator Week, June 20-26, 2016

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An Easy Guide to the Most Frequent Flower Visitors

April 3, 2013

Cover_edited-2.web

Beginners Guide to Pollinators and Other Flower Visitors. Beatriz Moisset

An illustrated beginner’s field guide to insect flower visitors, including pollinators. The guide provides concise descriptions, photos and life history information of the most common insects found visiting flowers. It includes time of year, geographic area and favorite flowers. Also mentioned are those that act as pollinators and whether they may sting.

Available at Amazon Barnes & Noble, iTunes and Lulu.com,

Flower Longhorn Beetles

August 11, 2012

Strangalepta abbreviata on Wild Hydrangea

Yellow-horn Strangalia on Button Bush

Longhorn beetles get their name because of their thin and long antennae, usually as long as their bodies or even longer. Among them there is a group often found on flowers, the flower longhorns. One interesting characteristic of flower longhorns is that they are all very slender, almost tubular shaped. Adults feed primarily on pollen and nectar; that is why they frequent flowers. They are mid sized beetles between 1/2 and 3/4″ in length, not including the antennae.

The Yellow-horn Strangalia is among the thinnest ones. Its long antennae are yellow, and they have a pattern of dots or marks on the wings. Found in the eastern states.

Cortodera

Strangalepta abbreviata is stouter, black with orange lengthwise stripes. There is great variation of markings: some are all black or almost all orange. Eastern and central states only.

Cortodera is similar to Strangalepta abbreviata but it is found only in the West.

Banded Longhorn beetle on Wild Hydrangea

The Banded Longhorn has a pattern similar to that of the Yellow-horn but it is easy to tell apart because of its stouter shape. It is still leaner than most beetles one is familiar with. Rich brown color with yellow-orange cross bands Sometimes the bands are reduced to spots. Eastern and central states only.

Habitat: Fields, openings, with flowers, adjacent to woodlands.

Season: From May to August, most abundant in June and July.

Flowers: Flowers of the carrot family, rose family, aster family. The Banded Longhorn has a special preference for Echinacea.

Flower longhorns
Yellow-horn Strangalia
Strangalepta abbreviata
Cortodera
Banded Longhorn

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Lady Bugs or Lady Beetles

August 3, 2012

Seven-spotted Lady Beetle (Coccinella septempunctata)

Polished Lady Beetle (Cycloneda munda)

Lady bugs have gained the affection of grownups and children alike. These colorful beetles go by other names such as lady beetles, or even ladybird beetles. Probably the most accurate one is lady beetle since it is a beetle, not a bug.

There are different kinds of lady beetles; most are brightly colored with a pattern of red with black spots, such as the Seven-spotted Lady Beetle; in a few this pattern is reversed. Others have some orange or yellow instead of red. There are even a few that lack spots altogether, like the Polished Lady Beetle, or that are mostly black.

Spotted Lady Beetle (Coleomegilla maculata)

They are fairly roundish, although a few have an oval shape, like the Spotted Lady Beetle. The smallest ones are about 0.04 in but the most familiar ones are larger, around 0.3 to 0.4 in.

Spotted Lady Beetle larva (Coleomegilla maculata)

Their babies or larvae don’t look like the adults at all. They look more like little alligators. They are rarely found on flowers because most of the time they stay on foliage or stems eating their favorite food, aphids.

Although they don’t distinguish themselves for being good pollinators, they are prized by gardeners because of their role as pest controls. They are voracious eaters of aphids and other soft bodied garden pests.

Habitat: Gardens, fields, anywhere that aphids abound.

Season: Year round in southern states, from March to October and even November in the rest of the country.

Flowers: They are more likely to be found on foliage than on flowers, but they do visit many different kinds of them.

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Soldier beetles

April 28, 2011

Goldenrod soldier beetle. Notice the black head and the square spot on the pronotum

Many beetles visit flowers. Some perform a moderate amount of pollination although, in general, they are not as good as other insects. Among them, soldier beetles are often found on flowers, feeding on nectar and pollen. Their larvae usually feed on eggs and larvae of other insects and are valued as biological pest controls. Soldier beetles are almost rectangular in shape and have red and black or orange and black colors. Some soldier beetles look like army uniforms of old times, before the days of camouflage and that is how they got their name. The first pair of wings of beetles is hard and serves to cover and protect the second pair which are membranous and used for flying. In soldier beetles the cover wings are softer; this has earned them their other common name, leatherwing beetles

Mating leatherwing beeltes. Notice the color of the head and the pronotum


Two very common soldier beetles are the goldenrod soldier beetle and the margined leatherwing. Both are very similar in appearance, orangish or yellow with black markings on the wings. These markings can vary in size markedly in both species. This makes it tricky to tell them apart. The main differences between the two types of beetles are that the goldenrod beetle has an all black head and the black spot on its pronotum (the section between the head and wings) is square. The margined leatherwing, on the other hand has some orange on the head and the pronotum’s dark patch is like a longitudinal bar.

Margined leatherback beetle. Notice the color of the wings


Finally, one good difference is the time of the year in which they are active. You find the goldenrod beetle in late summer and in the fall and it mostly visits goldenrod flowers. The margined leatherwing is active earlier in the season, so it is not likely to be seen on goldenrod, which hasn’t started blooming.

Habitat. Fields, gardens

Season. Margined leatherwing, from May to June or even July. Goldenrod soldier beetle, August, September

Flowers. Margined leatherwing, asters, queen Anne’s lace, milkweeds. Goldenrod soldier beetle, primarily goldenrod and other fall flowers.

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