Posts Tagged ‘bee’

Bring Back the Native Pollinators! We Need them More than Ever

May 20, 2015
A long-horned bee on sunflower © Beatriz Moisset

A long-horned bee on sunflower
© Beatriz Moisset

Excerpt from the USDA document prepared by the Division of Bee Culture in 1942: “The Dependence of Agriculture on the Beekeeping Industry—a Review.”

Wherever a proper balance exists between plants and pollinating insects, both flourish. Agricultural development, however, has seriously interfered with this balance. It has demanded the growing of certain plants in enormous acreages and has unwittingly destroyed native pollinating insects as well as their nesting places. As a result the burden of pollination has been increased to such an extent that wild bees are no longer adequate or dependable. . . In many places the depletion of wild pollinators is so acute that honeybees have to be brought in especially for pollination, and so in practically all agricultural areas honeybees are now the most numerous of the flower-visiting insects.

Read the full article in Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens 2014

Pumpkin patch teeming with bumble bees © Beatriz Moisset

Pumpkin patch teeming with bumble bees
© Beatriz Moisset

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Beginners Guide to Pollinators

January 13, 2014

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Beginners Guide to Pollinators and Other Flower Visitors. Beatriz Moisset

An illustrated beginner’s field guide to insect flower visitors, including pollinators. The guide provides concise descriptions, photos and life history information of the most common insects found visiting flowers. It includes time of year, geographic area and favorite flowers. Also mentioned are those that act as pollinators and whether they may sting.

Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes and Lulu.com

Available at no cost during Pollinator Week, June 20-26, 2016

An Easy Guide to the Most Frequent Flower Visitors

April 3, 2013

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Beginners Guide to Pollinators and Other Flower Visitors. Beatriz Moisset

An illustrated beginner’s field guide to insect flower visitors, including pollinators. The guide provides concise descriptions, photos and life history information of the most common insects found visiting flowers. It includes time of year, geographic area and favorite flowers. Also mentioned are those that act as pollinators and whether they may sting.

Available at Amazon Barnes & Noble, iTunes and Lulu.com,

Gallery of Leaf-cutter and Mason Bees

March 3, 2012

The bees of the family Megachilidae include the leaf-cutter bees and the mason bees. They have big powerful jaws, which is what Megachilidae means.

Megachile





Chelostoma

Anthidium


Coelioxys

Osmia



Gallery of Halictidae. Halictini

February 28, 2012

Lasioglossum




Halictus





Agapostemon


Gallery of Halictidae. Augochlorini

February 25, 2012

The members of the Augochlorini tribe of the family Halictidae are all metallic green, sometimes they have bluish or coppery tones. Their name refers to the green color. The most common ones in our area are Augochlora pura, Augochlorella aurata and Augochloropsis metallica.





Gallery of Colletidae

February 24, 2012

Colletidae is a small family of bees. They use a material similar to cellophane to build their nests and thus they are called cellophane or plasterer bees.




Gallery of carpenter bees

February 24, 2012

Carpenter bees belong to the Apidae family.

Xylocopa. The most familiar ones are the large carpenter bees of the genus Xylocopa. They get their name from their habit to drill holes in wood for nesting purposes. They prefer soft and untreated wood.



Ceratina. There are also small carpenter bees, Ceratina. They look very different and are considerably smaller. Instead of making their own nests by chewing on wood, they choose hollow twigs for nesting.



Gallery of Nomada bees

February 21, 2012

All the bees in the subfamily Nomadinae of the Apidae family are cleptoparasites, meaning that they lay their eggs in the nests of other bees and their larvae feed on the stored food as well as on the egg or larva of the host species. They don’t gather pollen, however they visit flowers in search of nectar and of hosts, so they accomplish some pollination. Many of them are active early in the spring and quite a few parasitize Andrenidae, another group of early bees. They are a difficult group, only a few can be identified to species by photos alone.





Gallery of long-horned bees, Eucerini

February 20, 2012

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